2022 NIL Thread

Pablo

Hall of Famer

"Kliavkoff told ESPN it's imperative to enforce rules prohibiting the use of NIL as a recruiting inducement or pay-for-play."
 

Leesburg Chankenstank III

All-American
⭐️ Donor ⭐️

"Kliavkoff told ESPN it's imperative to enforce rules prohibiting the use of NIL as a recruiting inducement or pay-for-play."
Now THAT’s comedy!
 
OP
jessej

jessej

Starter
⭐️ Donor ⭐️

"Kliavkoff told ESPN it's imperative to enforce rules prohibiting the use of NIL as a recruiting inducement or pay-for-play."
i wonder how much they had to pay the senators?
 

GMUgemini

Hall of Famer
⭐️ Donor ⭐️
Shouldn’t those commissioners be talking to their member presidents and shouldn’t the NCAA be doing the regulating?

The only thing congress should do is if the NCAA refuses to put guardrails up and it de facto becomes a pay for play schemed, they should rip the non-profit status off of college athletics and call the student-athletes employees.
 

Jack Strop

Starter
Shouldn’t those commissioners be talking to their member presidents and shouldn’t the NCAA be doing the regulating?

The only thing congress should do is if the NCAA refuses to put guardrails up and it de facto becomes a pay for play schemed, they should rip the non-profit status off of college athletics and call the student-athletes employees.
That's what I don't understand about the court's ruling on NIL without a period of adjustment for the NCAA to have had the opportunity to put regulations in place. It's like opening the door to a cageful of mice in a cracker factory (no pun intended).

Congress' involvement in matters of regulation most often come when industries and businesses fail to regulate themselves. However, the NCAA hasn't even started to form regulations. If the NCAA wants Congress to do the job for them then they're sadly in for major disappointment. It's either not going to happen any time soon (not a priority) or Congress will pass legislation that the NCAA and/or other stakeholders may not like. Therefore, the NCAA better get crackin'!
 

GSII

Hall of Famer
⭐️ Donor ⭐️
GOLD SPONSOR
Ncaa doesn't want lawsuits. If they make a new regulation, NIL proponents will sue. I vote Jollay as new ncaa prez.
 

GMUgemini

Hall of Famer
⭐️ Donor ⭐️
Ncaa doesn't want lawsuits. If they make a new regulation, NIL proponents will sue. I vote Jollay as new ncaa prez.

Much worse for them to have the NLRB come in a declare the student athletes employees and give them the right to collective bargaining. Much easier to defend a regulation which keeps competitive recruiting in place and prevents pay for play.
 

Jack Strop

Starter
Much worse for them to have the NLRB come in a declare the student athletes employees and give them the right to collective bargaining. Much easier to defend a regulation which keeps competitive recruiting in place and prevents pay for play.
Yeah... can you imagine a NCAA Men's Basketball strike and university lock-out? [*shudder*]
 
OP
jessej

jessej

Starter
⭐️ Donor ⭐️
As the NIL Turns
The NIL fight is here
mail
Photo by Andy Lyons/Getty Images
The NCAA is ready to start curbing the NIL frenzy, according to a great story from The Athletic’s Stewart Mandel and Nicole Auerbach this morning. Also in the story: agents laughing at the NCAA.

Therein lies the brewing brawl: the old guard, the NCAA enforcement arm, against the newly legal and emboldened foe: the NIL machine. The latter looks poised to win.

The gist: The NCAA will try to label the new collectives as boosters, thus subjecting them to specific rules which the NCAA will use to punish these above-the-table pay-for-play schemes. The problem? The law isn’t on the NCAA’s side.

Remember last summer when the NCAA lost 9-0 in a Supreme Court case, NCAA vs. Alston, in which the entire Supreme Court agreed that the NCAA as currently constructed was on thin ice? A direct quote from justice Brett Kavanaugh: “The NCAA’s business model would be flatly illegal in almost any other industry in America.”

So if the NCAA tries to levy any NIL penalties, expect lawsuits — immediately.

Money is flying at a frenzied pace right now, and it’s understandable for anyone who’s been a fan of college sports to wish a pause button existed so they could catch their breath. We don’t have any pause buttons, though, and the money isn’t slowing down anytime soon.

Get ready.
 
OP
jessej

jessej

Starter
⭐️ Donor ⭐️

Some choice gems:

" “I get it. Like, if I didn’t have to pay my employees I’d be pretty happy with things. But sadly, you actually have to play your employees. And that’s the way the world works. … When (coaches) say, ‘This isn’t supposed to be what this is about. This is supposed to be about education and mentoring young people and making them into better adults’ and all that stuff, OK, if you think this is what this is about. The doors to Division II and Division III are wide open. And coaching in high school, wide open. There’s nothing that’s stopping anyone from doing that, if that’s what you think it’s really about.

“Couple things. First of all, the reason they’re not doing it is because they don’t want to. Because they know that the players are worth more than they are. So asset allocation and money toward procuring talent is gonna be funneled differently than it is now. Right now it’s funneled to coaches and administrators for facilities and all these other things. And they know that model’s gonna change, and talent procurement is gonna take even more money, and it’s gonna take money away from other things.

Do any of these coaches feel similarly when an assistant comes in and they say, ‘Look, I’ve got an offer from another school for more money and if you can match it, great. If not, I’m gonna take this offer.’? They call that business. When a player does it, the coaches aren’t used to it. They’ve ruled with an iron fist for all this time and they’ve basically had a free ride with regard to players. They don’t have that anymore.

It took the legal system a while to catch up to fiction that the NCAA has put out all these years. But now they’re having to deal with it.

“We didn’t force them. Media rights companies don’t force these schools to play at certain times. They offer more money to play then, and they agree to it. We don’t force the coaches to do halftime interviews. It’s in the contract. We pay them money to do that, and they said ‘yes.’ And then they want to complain, ‘Well I don’t wanna do an interview at halftime.’ Well, we don’t care whether you wanna do it or not. You agreed to it, and we paid you for it. That’s sort of the way this stuff works. And somehow college sports acts like everybody’s impinging upon their rights here. And nobody is.

“If any of these schools … if Ohio State decides this is not for us, they can play in Division II or Division III and we can have the Buckeyes vs. Amherst at The Shoe for free admission and no TV. And see how Buckeye fans would like that. I don’t think they’ll like it, and I don’t think they’ll stand for it. But everybody can talk all they want to, but their actions show that they wanna participate in this multi-billion dollar entrainment industry run off their college campus, but they just don’t wanna play their employees — being the players — and that’s just not gonna work.” "
 

GMUgemini

Hall of Famer
⭐️ Donor ⭐️
I don’t like the arguments about DII and DIII being any different than DI.

I worked with college athletes at the DII level and they put in just as many hours of work as at the DI level. The same is true of non-revenue athletes. The demand for time and practice is just as much in womens soccer as it is in mens football.

So the only difference, really, is how much money these sports are making the school. It’s not about the work, it’s about the popularity.

So I do hope people who are saying just give the mens basketball and football players a salary realize they are inviting a title IX lawsuit on their hands unless you are also advocating paying the women athletes an equal amount (and then you’ll also run into the issue of “non-revenue” athletes getting shut oit, particularly those whose sports do generate revenue for their schools).
 

Some choice gems:

" “I get it. Like, if I didn’t have to pay my employees I’d be pretty happy with things. But sadly, you actually have to play your employees. And that’s the way the world works. … When (coaches) say, ‘This isn’t supposed to be what this is about. This is supposed to be about education and mentoring young people and making them into better adults’ and all that stuff, OK, if you think this is what this is about. The doors to Division II and Division III are wide open. And coaching in high school, wide open. There’s nothing that’s stopping anyone from doing that, if that’s what you think it’s really about.

“Couple things. First of all, the reason they’re not doing it is because they don’t want to. Because they know that the players are worth more than they are. So asset allocation and money toward procuring talent is gonna be funneled differently than it is now. Right now it’s funneled to coaches and administrators for facilities and all these other things. And they know that model’s gonna change, and talent procurement is gonna take even more money, and it’s gonna take money away from other things.

Do any of these coaches feel similarly when an assistant comes in and they say, ‘Look, I’ve got an offer from another school for more money and if you can match it, great. If not, I’m gonna take this offer.’? They call that business. When a player does it, the coaches aren’t used to it. They’ve ruled with an iron fist for all this time and they’ve basically had a free ride with regard to players. They don’t have that anymore.

It took the legal system a while to catch up to fiction that the NCAA has put out all these years. But now they’re having to deal with it.

“We didn’t force them. Media rights companies don’t force these schools to play at certain times. They offer more money to play then, and they agree to it. We don’t force the coaches to do halftime interviews. It’s in the contract. We pay them money to do that, and they said ‘yes.’ And then they want to complain, ‘Well I don’t wanna do an interview at halftime.’ Well, we don’t care whether you wanna do it or not. You agreed to it, and we paid you for it. That’s sort of the way this stuff works. And somehow college sports acts like everybody’s impinging upon their rights here. And nobody is.

“If any of these schools … if Ohio State decides this is not for us, they can play in Division II or Division III and we can have the Buckeyes vs. Amherst at The Shoe for free admission and no TV. And see how Buckeye fans would like that. I don’t think they’ll like it, and I don’t think they’ll stand for it. But everybody can talk all they want to, but their actions show that they wanna participate in this multi-billion dollar entrainment industry run off their college campus, but they just don’t wanna play their employees — being the players — and that’s just not gonna work.” "

Can't this all boil down to:

"I went to Duke. Duke can afford to pay. I hate mid-majors. What's the problem?"
 

GMUgemini

Hall of Famer
⭐️ Donor ⭐️
Can't this all boil down to:

"I went to Duke. Duke can afford to pay. I hate mid-majors. What's the problem?"

Could Duke afford to pay their football players though? That’s an interesting question.

I imagine what would happen is you’d have maybe 75 basketball teams and about 30 football teams survive professionalizing the sports.
 
OP
jessej

jessej

Starter
⭐️ Donor ⭐️
Could Duke afford to pay their football players though? That’s an interesting question.

I imagine what would happen is you’d have maybe 75 basketball teams and about 30 football teams survive professionalizing the sports.
multiple options
1) reductions in salary and staff of University Athletic Departments
2) proportional reductions of non revenue sports consistent with Title IX
3) formation of a Super College League composed of those top 30 schools able to pay their student athletes
4) shifts of some school to Division II and others to Club status
 

GSII

Hall of Famer
⭐️ Donor ⭐️
GOLD SPONSOR
If #1 happens there will be no coaches left. But maybe then we get Jollay as GMU head coach?..... Imagine Patrick Holloway momma coaching his college team....college bball is gonna turn into aau.
 
Last edited:
OP
jessej

jessej

Starter
⭐️ Donor ⭐️
i can imagine a future where the team business manager is just as important as the coach - at least for the top 25 programs with large amounts of NIL money
 

THANK YOU!

Our donors make all of this possible! Thank you for your continued support of MasonHoops, we couldn't do it without you.

Forum statistics

Threads
1,968
Messages
168,334
Members
855
Latest member
Jtothep
Top